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2012/12/01

3 Videos: Sexiest Man Alive? 'Onion' Pranks N. Korean Leader and the Chinese Media Believed it!

-Just ask me next time!

Nov. 27 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg's Josh Lipton reports that The People's Daily newspaper in China missed the sarcasm and ran a story from the satirical news site The Onion naming North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Un 2012's "Sexiest man Alive." He speaks on Bloomberg Television's "Lunch Money."
http://youtu.be/eaxTXecB7T4



The Chinese Communist Party has been making headlines today. By sticking their foot in their Party mouthpiece. Official CCP paper The People's Daily was quick to assume this news report about the leader of fellow Communist ally North Korea was completely true.

But, the article is in fact one written by US satire and fake news service, The Onion. It called North Korea's Kim Jong Un their "Sexiest Man Alive" for 2012. And The People's Daily celebrated that with a photo tribute.

It showed Kim at various state events, including one carefully-staged shot of him on horseback. Any hope that the article was self-aware ends there.

But it's okay, the Korea Times made the same mistake about a week ago.

The Onion has now updated their original story, linking to The People's Daily article and calling the Communist mouthpiece "a proud Communist subsidiary of The Onion Inc."

http://youtu.be/zi_G27Ej5xc



Forget Channing Tatum: Korean dictator Kim Jong Un is the sexiest man of 2012, according to the Chinese Communist Party mouthpiece People's Daily — and the satirical news site The Onion.

The website of the paper of record for China's authoritarian ruling party regularly features positive reports on its even more authoritarian neighbor, North Korea, and its 28-year old leader Kim Jong Un. This time, however, People's Daily editors may have been a bit too eager to please.

"With his devastatingly handsome, round face, his boyish charm, and his strong, sturdy frame, this Pyongyang-bred heartthrob is every woman's dream come true," the People's Daily quoted from the fictitious report, going on to add this line, by the (also fictitious) Onion Style and Entertainment editor Marissa Blake-Zweibel: "He has that rare ability to somehow be completely adorable and completely macho at the same time."

The People's Daily story was accompanied by a massive slideshow of Kim seen riding a horse, waving to troops, sporting a straw hat, hugged by a dozen female soldiers and even on the cover of TIME.

A journalist named Zhang Qian, who appears to have been the translator and editor of the story, last prepared a slideshow of the North Korean dictator and his wife Ri Sol Ju watching a women's volleyball match in early November.

After The Onion found out about the People's Daily story, it updated its original article with this text:

For more coverage on The Onion's Sexiest Man Alive 2012, Kim Jong-Un, please visit our friends at the People's Daily in China, a proud Communist subsidiary of The Onion, Inc. Exemplary reportage, comrades.

Earlier in September, the Iranian state-run news agency Fars also took an an article by The Onion too seriously. According to a bogus Gallup poll, the article read, "rural white Americans would rather vote for Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad than for Barack Obama."

In China, the Beijing Evening News jumped on another Onion article in 2002, which stated that Congress threatened to leave Washington D.C. unless the city agreed to build it a new Capitol.
http://youtu.be/9azKo9rAcXg

2012/11/30

Now it's cool in China to get female bodyguards to kick A$$ if you are a billionaire!

-They better not get frisky... 

Young women in China are signing up for intense training to become protection machines.
http://youtu.be/JnAXQO5z8IQ

2012/11/29

Hutongs 101: 4 Amazing videos captured the vanishing history of Beijing

-Quaint, shameful, old. 

For a slice of real Chinese life, peek inside traditional courtyard houses called Hutongs.
http://youtu.be/taRQ0fI704k


The Fate of Old Beijing: The Vanishing Hutongs from Jonah Kessel on Vimeo.
In the face of China’s rapid modernization, the world’s most populous country is struggling to preserve its cultural heritage, and nowhere is this more visible than in the ancient alleyways and courtyards of Beijing.

Once a ubiquitous feature of Beijing, the hutongs are more than simply housing; they are actually a way of life. Entire families live in single, crowded courtyards, often with no bathrooms. Yet despite the lack of modern amenities, the communal aspect to life within the hutongs means that few want to leave – even as their neighbourhoods are being demolished and redeveloped. UNESCO estimates that more than 88 percent of the city’s old residential quarters are already gone, most torn down in the last three decades.

--

This video has also been split into three smaller parts that can be viewed independently here:

CHAPTER ONE - A Disappearing World: http://vimeo.com/19122141

For many residents, hutong life is all they have ever known, and their memories and lives are intertwined strongly with the old streets and alleyways. Yet as time has gone by, many of the courtyards have become overcrowded and the buildings themselves have deteriorated. Despite the cultural heritage of the hutongs thousands of them have been razed in the past decades to make way for urban development destroying centuries of history and contributing to the shrinking of the remaining hutong space.

CHAPTER TWO — David vs. Goliath - http://vimeo.com/19324494:

While hutong residents may not have the easiest lives, few want to leave the streets and alleyways they have long called home. However, with China’s current legal system offering few avenues of discourse it is hard for residents to save their homes after they have been slated for demolition. Some are torn down to make way for new subway lines but, increasingly, a large number are simply torn down to be replaced by large high rise buildings that primarily benefit the land developers and local officials.

CHAPTER THREE — Beyond the Alleys: http://vimeo.com/19341584

If Beijing’s hutong areas are to be retained in one form or another, decisions need to be made about whether to invest money in keeping the original structures or replacing them with replicas built in the same style but offering modern amenities – a move that many suggest destroys the soul of the buildings. While for former hutong residents forced or happily leaving their old homes, a new way of life beckons.

For more information on this project visit:
http://blog.jonahkessel.com/the-fate-of-old-beijing/

The Fate of Old Beijing: CH. 2 - David vs. Goliath from Jonah Kessel on Vimeo.
David vs. Goliath, is part two of the three-part series "The Fate of Old Beijing: The Vanishing Hutongs."

In the face of China’s rapid modernization, the world’s most populous country is struggling to preserve its cultural heritage, and nowhere is this more visible than in the ancient alleyways and courtyards of Beijing.

Once a ubiquitous feature of Beijing, the hutongs are more than simply housing; they are actually a way of life. Entire families live in single, crowded courtyards, often with no bathrooms. Yet despite the lack of modern amenities, the communal aspect to life within the hutongs means that few want to leave – even as their neighbourhoods are being demolished and redeveloped. UNESCO estimates that more than 88 percent of the city’s old residential quarters are already gone, most torn down in the last three decades.

In a three-part series, filmmakers Jonah Kessel and Kit Gillet explore the vanishing world of Beijing’s hutongs, the realities of life within the narrow streets, and the future for these culturally-irreplaceable areas of China’s capital.

CHAPTER TWO: While hutong residents may not have the easiest lives, few want to leave the streets and alleyways they have long called home. However, with China’s current legal system offering few avenues of discourse it is hard for residents to save their homes after they have been slated for demolition. Some are torn down to make way for new subway lines but, increasingly, a large number are simply torn down to be replaced by large high rise buildings that primarily benefit the land developers and local officials.

The Fate of Old Beijing: CH. 3 - Beyond the Alleys from Jonah Kessel on Vimeo.
Beyond the Alleys, is part three of the three-part series "The Fate of Old Beijing: The Vanishing Hutongs."

In the face of China’s rapid modernization, the world’s most populous country is struggling to preserve its cultural heritage, and nowhere is this more visible than in the ancient alleyways and courtyards of Beijing.

Once a ubiquitous feature of Beijing, the hutongs are more than simply housing; they are actually a way of life. Entire families live in single, crowded courtyards, often with no bathrooms. Yet despite the lack of modern amenities, the communal aspect to life within the hutongs means that few want to leave – even as their neighbourhoods are being demolished and redeveloped. UNESCO estimates that more than 88 percent of the city’s old residential quarters are already gone, most torn down in the last three decades.

In a three-part series, filmmakers Jonah Kessel and Kit Gillet explore the vanishing world of Beijing’s hutongs, the realities of life within the narrow streets, and the future for these culturally-irreplaceable areas of China’s capital.

CHAPTER THREE: If Beijing’s hutong areas are to be retained in one form or another, decisions need to be made about whether to invest money in keeping the original structures or replacing them with replicas built in the same style but offering modern amenities – a move that many suggest destroys the soul of the buildings. While for former hutong residents forced or happily leaving their old homes, a new way of life beckons.

2012/11/28

China's Meat Eaters: Sustainability, Pork and a Massive Middle Class

-love those pigs... 

As China strains to meet its growing food needs, consumers insist that the government not cut corners. This report from Mary Kay Magistad is part of the "Food for 9 Billion" series, a NewsHour collaboration with the Center for Investigative Reporting, American Public Media's Marketplace, Public Radio International's The World and Homelands Productions.
http://youtu.be/YchgZE5_1GY

2012/11/27

And you think Chinese Footbinding was bad: American Women chopping off Pinky toe to fit into stilettos!

-SICK SICK SICK SICK!

Removing a toe to fit into heels? - ShoeCurator.com says: an increasing number of women choose foot surgery in order to be able to wear their favourite pair of high heels.
http://youtu.be/1EvXXKgHTbE

Golden Lotus Movie Trailer!

Set against the backdrop of 21st century China, the filmmaker searches along the banks of the northern Yellow River and in remote villages in southwest Yunnan for the last survivors of Bound Feet.- China's 1,000 year-old tradition of erotic beauty, mutilation and female survival. Told through the first person narrative of the filmmaker who was raised by her bound-feet grandmother, the film captures otherwise lost voices and the haunting memory of 12 bound-feet Chinese women of ages ranging from 78 to 106, including that of the 90 year-old paper cut folk artist, Ms. Yang Hui Xiu. Through the exclusive portrayal of women of a bygone era, the film reveals one of the darkest secrets of Chinese civilization and women's changing destiny in a society once, and perhaps still, dominated by men.
http://youtu.be/aR-bBs-kXMg

2012/11/26

See a Creepy Chinese Acupuncture Mannequin at the Philadelphia Mütter Museum

-What's next what's next? I'm on pins and needles! 

Every Monday The Director of the Mütter Museum takes a minute to showcase an item from our collection. This week Robert showcases a Chinese acupuncture mannequin from the 19th century and a Japanese acupuncture manuscript that is three centuries old.

To learn more about the Mütter Museum or The College of Physicians of Philadelphia,
visit our website: http://www.collegeofphysicians.org.
http://youtu.be/AnI4dRUox78

2012/11/25

Chinese Music Journey: Shanghai Trailer

-Trailer is bad quality but the DVD is much better. 

Naxos Scenic Musical Journeys Shanghai A Cultural Tour with Traditional Chinese Music
Naxos DVD Trailer: A Cultural Tour with Traditional Chinese Music

The city of Shanghai, China's most important port, owes some of its prosperity to the so-called unequal treatises forced on China during the 19th century. The place had its origin as a settlement during the Tang dynasty (618-906 A.D.), but the Treaty of Nanking in 1842 ceded Hong Kong to the British and made possible the development of foreign trade through the five 'treaty ports', of which Shanghai became the most important. The growth of Shanghai into an international trading centre and the concessions made to various foreign countries explain the interesting mixture of architectural styles, continued today with the high-rise buildings of recent years.
http://youtu.be/0xSWVf1G9l0


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